Tag Archives: vaness

BBB Advice on Donating by Text Message for Haiti Relief Efforts

January 14, 2010 – Arlington, VA – In the wake of the earthquake
disaster in Haiti, Americans are donating via text message more than ever before. BBB Wise Giving Alliance advises donors that giving through text can be a safe and easy way to give—but you should still use caution.

Within days following the disaster in Haiti, it was widely reported that more than $3 million was donated through text message to such organizations as the Red Cross and others.

“It’s encouraging that people are making small donations through text messages,” said Art Taylor, President and CEO of the BBB Wise Giving Alliance. “An incredible amount of money will be needed to address the crisis in Haiti and charities will certainly welcome gifts made through any means available. However, donors should still do their due diligence to make sure their money is going to trustworthy charities.”

BBB Wise Giving Alliance offers the following tips on giving through text:

  • Confirm the number directly with the source. While BBB Wise Giving Alliance has not yet heard of any scams relying on text message donations, this emerging method for donating is ripe for exploitation by scammers.
  • Be aware that text donations are not immediate. Depending on the text message service used by the charity, text donations can take anywhere from 30-90 days to be transferred to the designated charity. If you would like the donation to be received immediately by the charity, you can give online through the charity Web site, by calling the charity directly or by sending a check in the mail.
  • Review the fine print. When you give to a charity through text message, you might also be signing yourself up to receive text message updates from the charity in the future. A charity should include the details of its text campaign on its Web site so you can see what you’re signing up and how you can opt out.
  • Research the charity. Giving wisely to a charity isn’t just about making sure that the solicitation isn’t coming from scammers. Wise donors make sure their donations are going to charities that are best equipped to help in the relief efforts and responsibly use the money for its intended purpose.

For more information or to schedule an interview with a BBB Wise Giving Alliance spokesperson, contact Alison Southwick at 703-247-9376.

Only 2 days left

We’ve seen an amazing response so far, but to reach our goal of 1,000 new donors by Thursday, we need you to make a matching donation right now:

Donate.


http://repoweramerica.org/match

Let’s be clear. The only way we’re going to win on clean energy is to upend business as usual politics.

Enough people need to act with enough strength that our elected officials can look beyond what Big Oil and Big Coal want — so they can lead, taking us into the 21st century to a clean energy economy. Otherwise those powerful special interests will ensure that we ignore the greatest challenge of our time.

We’ve got to push past them with a movement of ordinary Americans just like you coming together to solve the climate crisis so we can revitalize our country and leave our children and grandchildren a legacy of clean American energy.

You can see the personal determination people have to seize this moment in the notes supporters like you have been sharing as they match each other’s donations. I wanted to share a few of these notes with you:


Mathew in Norristown, PA:

Thank you so much for your support. Every person that contributes is making an investment in our future. A future with clean renewable energy for our children, thank you again.

Daniella in Los Gatos, CA:

It surprises me that we are even having to battle Big Dirty Energy at this late stage in the game. Yet, fight we must. Thank you Joan for offering this matching fund opportunity.

Jeremy in Edgewood, KY:

Thanks for matching my donation Ali. I believe clean energy is the way to greater prosperity and security for this great nation of ours (and for the world).  Let’s make it happen.

Join each of these new supporters by making your first contribution today. A previous donor has pledged to match your gift, doubling your impact.

Make your first donation of $25 now. If you’d like, you can exchange a note with the donor who matched your contribution.

The powerful interests thrive when we sit on our hands. But their power wilts when we decide to act.

We can have the clean energy future America so urgently needs — but only if we’re willing to fight for it. Help inspire a movement big, broad and strong enough to win.

Thanks for everything you do,

Maggie L. Fox
President and CEO
The Alliance for Climate Protection

Many people, many paths, one Dharma

As skillful means we can employ whatever is useful, whatever is truly helpful. For each of us at different times, different traditions, philosophical constructs, and methods may serve us, either because of temperament, background, or capacities. For some, the language of emptiness may be as dry as the desert, while for others it may reveal the heart-essence of liberation. Some may quickly recognize the nature of awareness itself, while others emphasize the letting go of those mind states that obscure it. Some may find that the path of devotion truly empties the self, but for others this way may simply act as a cloud of self-delusion. We each need great honesty of introspection and wise guidance from teachers to find our own skillful path.

Sponsored by www.vaness.ws

The Science of Success eBook

New Webcast

I’m starting a new weekly webcast. I have had many requests for more inspirational materials. Fortunately, I’m starting a weekly webcast at www.tinyurl.com/belpte. On this webcast, I will address many self-help issues.

It’s starting this sunday at 9pm EST and every sunday after, at the same time. Just come in, it’s FREE.

If you would like to suggest topics for future webcast, send your requests to topics@vaness.ws

I am also starting, next week a series of webisodes based on my weekly webcast. Those will be available on this blog, my website, as well as on Youtube.

Sponsored by http://www.vaness.ws

Practical Spirituality

6 Ways to De-Stress at the Dinner Table

Legal Ace

Maybe “dinner” consists of lukewarm takeout, eaten alone in front of the TV while you surf the Internet and answer email. Or perhaps the eat-and-run dinners you share with your spouse or partner barely leave you time to say “hello” and “goodbye” to each other. Or maybe your kitchen is starting to resemble a fast-food restaurant, with family members coming in and out and grabbing a bite between activities.

While the dinner hour once represented a calm oasis from the day’s storm, experts say today it’s often anything but relaxing.

“We’re hurried, we’re harried, we’ve turned up the volume of our lives to such a high number that we often can’t even see how stressed we are. And we almost never see how we bring that stress to the dinner table, a place where traditionally we sought relaxation and comfort,” says Mimi Donaldson, a stress and time management expert.

With blaring TVs, ringing cell phones and “You’ve got mail!” chiming in the background, in some homes the dinner hour is every bit as stressful as the rest of the day, says Donaldson, co-author of the book Bless Your Stress: It Means You’re Still Alive.

“When you add in sibling rivalry and a dose of parental discipline, mealtime can quickly become a combat zone that nobody wants to enter,” says Donaldson.

If you’re thinking all this doesn’t matter much, think again.

Recent research at Columbia University found that children who regularly had dinner with their families are less likely to abuse drugs or alcohol, and more likely to do better in school. In fact, studies show the best-adjusted children are those who eat with an adult at least five times a week, says Ann Von Berber, PhD, chair of the department of nutrition sciences at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth.

“Many studies support the importance of family mealtime in decreasing the incidence of teens who smoke, drink alcohol, participate in sex at a young age, start fights, get suspended from school, or commit suicide,” says Von Berber.

And kids aren’t the only ones who benefit from a peaceful repast. Experts say that couples as well as singles reap benefits when mealtime is a relaxing experience.

“It’s not only better for the soul and spirit to dine quietly and slowly — even if you’re alone — but it’s also good for the digestion,” says Loren Ekroth, PhD, a former family therapist from Las Vegas who is the founder of Conversation-Matters.com.

6 Ways to Create Mealtime Bliss

Of course, knowing we should relax at dinnertime is one thing; actually doing it is something else. To help you get started, our experts offered six guidelines for creating a mealtime experience everyone will look forward to.
Save 20% on smartphone software and games at Handango.com with promo code SAVE20NOW.

1. Turn Down the Volume.

Nothing brings down the stress level like turning down the volume of your environment.

“That means no cell phones, no TV, and no radios blaring in the background, and it means not answering the phone during mealtime,” says Ekroth.

What should be in the background? Soft, soothing music is an instant stress buster.

Ekroth suggests letting each family member contribute suggestions about what to play, or letting a different person pick the music for each meal. If you have a CD burner, a good family project is creating an hour of dinner music that includes everyone’s favorite relaxing tunes.

2. Set the Table to Set the Mood

While you may not want to pull out the good china for every meal, a brightly colored tablecloth is a simple way to give a special look and feel even to your old kitchen plates, says food artist and cookbook author Paula La Mont.

Her trick for making any table setting seem more relaxing, even when the plates don’t match: “Buy an inexpensive bouquet of fresh flowers for the table,” says La Mont, author of the forthcoming The Little Celebration Cookbook.

“It doesn’t have to be elaborate, but it sends the message that dinner is special and we are, too.”

3. Let There Be (Soft) Light

Dimming the lighting in the room and adding some candles on the dinner table can go a long way in lowering everyone’s stress level.

“Candles also traditionally mark an occasion, so lighting them at the dinner table is a way of saying ‘This meal is special — we’re special,’ or even if you are single, saying ‘I’m special,”’ says Renee Schettler, food editor for Real Simple magazine and author of Meals Made Simple. “You get a lot for a little with candles.”

If you have young children, try using one large candle set in a weighted base to ensure it doesn’t fall over, La Mont suggests.

“You can also turn lighting the candle into part of the dinner ritual — something that signals the start of a meal — and let a different child do the lighting each time,” says La Mont.

4. Control the Conversation

Too often, say experts, we see dinner with our partner or family as an opportunity to air grievances. This can be particularly true for parents, who may turn the dinner hour into a discipline hour, often because they feel it’s the only time they have their child’s attention.

To avoid this, experts recommend establishing a few ground rules for dinnertime conversation.

“Be positive and postpone negative comments for another time,” says Van Berber. “Avoid lecturing and scolding, and instead reward good manners and good behavior with positive comments.”

Further, experts say, don’t use mealtime to discuss the “honey-do” list, your medical problems, or why you hate your boss, or your mother. Instead, prompt engaging conversation by discussing the highlights of your day, or by planning a fantasy vacation — discussing where you’d go if you could go anywhere in the world.
Compusa (Systemax, Inc.)

“Make it a time that centers on the positive things that happened that week or that day,” says Donaldson. “It’s the time to tell your spouse or your children, or both, that what they did that week or that day made you really proud.”

5. Keep Your Cool in the Kitchen

The table can look great, the music may be delightful, the food might smell terrific, but if the cook is frenzied, those at the table will be, too, experts say.

“When you get home, take a few minutes before heading into the kitchen to collect yourself,” says Schettler. “Take a deep breath, and whether you have 30 seconds or 30 minutes, try to put the day behind you and give yourself the chance to switch gears before you try to make everyone else relax.”

It also helps to get as many dinner-related tasks done ahead of time as you can.

“Put the meat in the marinade in the morning or wash the vegetables and boil the macaroni or potatoes for salads the night before,” says Schettler. “The less you have to do at mealtime, the more relaxed you will be and the more relaxed your family will feel.”

6. Keep It Real

While it would be great if you could make every meal a shelter from the storm, realistically, there are days when that’s just not going to happen.

“Family meals do not have to take place every night,” says Van Berber, “nor do they need extensive planning.”

To make relaxing meals a reality, she says, schedule them on your calendar. And remember, that dinnertime isn’t the only time you can have a special meal.

“If breakfast is easier to plan than a dinner meal, make a commitment to gather in the morning several times a week,” she says.

It’s the sharing and the bonding — not the food — that matter most.
Sony Creative Software Inc.

SYNCING.NET - Share Music, Pictures and Videos

Stress is the body’s reaction to any change that requires an adjustment or response. The body reacts to these changes with physical, mental, and emotional responses.

Stress is a normal part of life. Many events that happen to you and around you — and many things that you do yourself — put stress on your body. You can experience stress from your environment, your body, and your thoughts.

How does stress affect health?

The human body is designed to experience stress and react to it. Stress can be positive, keeping us alert and ready to avoid danger. Stress becomes negative when a person faces continuous challenges without relief or relaxation between challenges. As a result, the person becomes overworked, and stress-related tension builds.

Stress that continues without relief can lead to a condition called distress — a negative stress reaction. Distress can lead to physical symptoms including headaches, upset stomach, elevated blood pressure, chest pain, and problems sleeping. Research suggests that stress also can bring on or worsen certain symptoms or diseases.

Stress also becomes harmful when people use alcohol, tobacco, or drugs to try to relieve their stress. Unfortunately, instead of relieving the stress and returning the body to a relaxed state, these substances tend to keep the body in a stressed state and cause more problems. Consider the following:

  • Forty-three percent of all adults suffer adverse health effects from stress.
  • Seventy-five to 90% of all doctor’s office visits are for stress-related ailments and complaints.
  • Stress can play a part in problems such as headaches, high blood pressure, heart problems, diabetes, skin conditions, asthma, or arthritis in addition to depression and anxiety.
  • The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) declared stress a hazard of the workplace. Stress costs American industry more than $300 billion annually.
  • The lifetime prevalence of an emotional disorder is more than 50%, often due to chronic, untreated stress reactions.

BuyAndWalk.com

Why Hair Goes Gray

Ageless

Scientists may have figured out why hair turns gray, and their finding may open the door to new anti-graying strategies.

New research shows that hair turns gray as a result of a chemical chain reaction that causes hair to bleach itself from the inside out.

The process starts when there is a dip in levels of an enzyme called catalase. That catalase shortfall means that the hydrogen peroxide that naturally occurs in hair can’t be broken down. So hydrogen peroxide builds up in the hair, and because other enzymes that would repair hydrogen peroxide’s damage are also in short supply, the hair goes gray.

Putting the brakes on that chemical chain reaction “could have great implications in the hair graying scenario in humans,” write the researchers, who included Karin Schallreuter, a professor clinical and experimental dermatology at England’s University of Bradford.

The study appears online in The FASEB Journal; the FASEB is the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology.

Hay House, Inc.